This is, to say the least, awesome!

SEPTEMBER 14, 2014, 9:45 AM|When Kathy Rackley told Malcolm Mitchell - a wide receiver at the University of Georgia - about her book club, she had no idea who he was, or what would happen next. Steve Hartman reports on what one college football player calls his greatest accomplishment.

"I’ve read some stories where it’s difficult to tell where the story stops and I begin. Those are the best stories."—TBV

"I’ve read some stories where it’s difficult to tell where the story stops and I begin. Those are the best stories."—TBV

September 8 was proclaimed International Literacy Day by UNESCO on November 17, 1965. It was first celebrated in 1966. Its aim is to highlight the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies. On International Literacy Day each year, UNESCO reminds the international community of the status of literacy and adult learning globally. Celebrations take place around the world.

Some 775 million adults lack minimum literacy skills; one in five adults is still not literate and two-thirds of them are women; 60.7 million children are out-of-school and many more attend irregularly or drop out. Read More || Edit || Quote by me.

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers

As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.

247 plays

oupacademic:

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography podcast: Arthur Conan Doyle, writer

Conan Doyle’s fiction made astonishing progress in the early 1880s. He learned the economics of the short story from the work of Guy de Maupassant and from the Edinburgh medical journals with their logical progress from case-statement to collection of symptoms, rival diagnoses, and finally to ultimate conclusion and explanation. His first translation of these techniques into fiction ended in what is now called A Study in Scarlet. The story brought together Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time and a lifelong series was launched.

The story of Arthur Conan Doyle is one of over 200 episodes available from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography’s podcast archive. New episodes are released every second Wednesday.

Image: Portrait of Arthur Conan Doyle, The Canadian Magazine. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

A perfect way to start your morning.

A perfect way to start your morning.

Whenever I have endured or accomplished some difficult task — such as watching television, going out socially or sleeping — I always look forward to rewarding myself with the small pleasure of getting back to my typewriter and writing something.
Isaac Asimov
A novelist has to know enough about a subject to fool the passenger next to him on an airplane.
David Foster Wallace

Alan Moore finishes million-word novel Jerusalem

I love Alan Moore’s work. Can’t wait to see this work published!

Those who write are writers. Those who wait are waiters. ― A. Lee Martinez
[I’ve been both and I can tell you, waiters have it easier, just ask the writers about that.]

macrolit:

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky

hulu:

If you don’t read a book for Read a Book Day, how will you tell everyone you already knew what was going to happen when it eventually gets turned into a TV show?

Or a movie, for that matter.

hulu:

If you don’t read a book for Read a Book Day, how will you tell everyone you already knew what was going to happen when it eventually gets turned into a TV show?

Or a movie, for that matter.

I’m fundamentally, I think, an outsider. I do my best work and feel most braced with my back to the wall. It’s an odd feeling, though, writing against the current: difficult entirely to disregard the current. Yet of course I shall.
Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry (via violentwavesofemotion)
themirame:

Alice Bailly - Self-Portrait, 1917. Oil on canvas, 81 cm (31.89 in.) x 60 cm (23.62 in.). Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland

themirame:

Alice Bailly - Self-Portrait, 1917. Oil on canvas, 81 cm (31.89 in.) x 60 cm (23.62 in.). Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland