If you are destined to become a writer, you can’t help it. If you can help it, you aren’t destined to become a writer. The frustrations and disappointments, not even to mention the unspeakable loneliness, are too unbearable for anyone who doesn’t have a deep sense of being unable to avoid writing.
Donald Harington

yocalio:

"If the novel has a theme it is that of survival. What makes some people able to come through catastrophes and others, apparently just as able, strong and brave, go under? It happens in every upheaval. Some people survive; others don’t. What qualities are in those who fight their way through triumphantly that are lacking in those who go under…? I only know that the survivors used to call that quality ‘gumption.’ So I wrote about the people who had gumption and the people who didn’t.”  — Margaret Mitchell, 1936

Make time to read!

Make time to read!

benbrahemb:

"The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us, and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone."
-George Eliot-

benbrahemb:

"The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us, and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone."

-George Eliot-

Popularity is the hallmark of mediocrity.
Niles Crane (via early-onset-of-night)
I’m ready for fall.

I’m ready for fall.

Classic

Classic

Break out of the daily routine!

Break out of the daily routine!

teachingliteracy:

Higher Learning by jhutter

Let reading take you places.

teachingliteracy:

Higher Learning by jhutter

Let reading take you places.

All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse and the sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was. If you can get so that you can give that to people, then you are a writer.
Ernest Hemingway in Esquire, December 1934

Read and Write - two essentials of life (other than coffee).

apoetreflects:

“It is usual that the moment you write for publication … one stiffens in exactly the same way one does when one is being photographed.  The simplest way to overcome this is to write it to someone, like me.  Write it as a letter aimed at one person.  This removes the vague terror of addressing the large and faceless audience and it also, you will find, will give a sense of freedom and a lack of self-consciousness.”
—John Steinbeck, from The Writer’s Chapbook, edited and introduced by George Plimpton (Viking Penguin, 1989)

apoetreflects:

“It is usual that the moment you write for publication … one stiffens in exactly the same way one does when one is being photographed.  The simplest way to overcome this is to write it to someone, like me.  Write it as a letter aimed at one person.  This removes the vague terror of addressing the large and faceless audience and it also, you will find, will give a sense of freedom and a lack of self-consciousness.”

—John Steinbeck, from The Writer’s Chapbook, edited and introduced by George Plimpton (Viking Penguin, 1989)

Listen to your life. See it for the fathomless mystery it is. In the boredom and pain of it, no less than in the excitement and gladness: touch, taste, smell your way to the holy and hidden heart of it, because in the last analysis all moments are key moments, and life itself is grace.
Frederick Buechner (via misswallflower)

theparisreview:

Kurt Vonnegut reads from Slaughterhouse-Five. (via)

Hard at work.

Hard at work.