I’m astounded whenever I finish something. Astounded and distressed. My perfectionist instinct should inhibit me from finishing: it should inhibit me from even beginning. But I get distracted and start doing something. What I achieve is not the product of an act of my will but of my will’s surrender. I begin because I don’t have the strength to think; I finish because I don’t have the courage to quit. This book is my cowardice.
Fernando Pessoa

nprbooks:

mashable:

This Tiny Book of Historical Events Is Smaller Than a Finger Tip

Denver-based illustrator Evan Lorenzen created The Mini Book of Major Events, a hand-sewn book barely larger than a pencil eraser.

I don’t think I can make another Tiny Food Party reference again so soon, so I’ll just say TINY BOOK OMG WHEE AWESOME!

— Petra

That’s just a little bit of ‘really cool.’

Write, Reflect & Dream

Write, Reflect & Dream

When I begin to doubt my ability to work the word, I simply read another writer and know I have nothing to worry about. My contest is only with myself, to do it right, with power, and force, and delight, and gamble.
Charles Bukowski

Paradise

yeahwriters:

I can’t even… omg

That’s cool.

yeahwriters:

I can’t even… omg

That’s cool.

yoiness:

#black and white  #a song is born

You can never have too many books

yoiness:

  

You can never have too many books

theparisreview:

“University presses don’t just publish books: they keep books in print and rescue out-of-print books from obscurity … But the digital age complicates and threatens the mission of the country’s approximately 100 university presses. Ellen Faran, director of MIT Press, recently told Harvard Magazine: ‘I like doing things that are impossible, and there’s nothing more impossible than university-press publishing.’”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

“University presses don’t just publish books: they keep books in print and rescue out-of-print books from obscurity … But the digital age complicates and threatens the mission of the country’s approximately 100 university presses. Ellen Faran, director of MIT Press, recently told Harvard Magazine: ‘I like doing things that are impossible, and there’s nothing more impossible than university-press publishing.’”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Make time to read!

Make time to read!

An Explanation of The Book Meme

Per this request - injusticeworth said: any chance that you might talk about one or two of them? er, if you have the time and interest, of course; always intrigued by these stories - I am going to to explain (briefly) how a couple of these books actually changed me …

Dhalgren by Samuel R. Delany. After I had read this book in high school (back in early 80s), I was convinced I wanted to be a writer. I thought if I could write 1% as well as Samuel R. Delany, I would be a sufficient writer. After I read the first line of the book: “to wound the autumnal city,”—yes, it began with a lower case “t”—I paused for a long time trying to understand what he meant, and realized he began this work with a lower case and it was published that way. He had control over what he wrote. This was a major revelation for me at that age since my teachers pretty much had control over everything I wrote, and often how I wrote it. Shortly after reading this book I began writing. To this day I still love to write thanks to Samuel R. Delany.

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer. I was working at one of the largest financial institutions in the world when I read this. I was making a crap ton of money but I was miserable. I hated life, I hated my job, I hated my existence. I honestly thought I had no way out of my current situation. Then, after reading this book, the next day I walked into my office building, went directly to my supervisor and gave him my immediate resignation. These very words from that book gave me the courage to do that— 

So many people live within unhappy circumstances and yet will not take the initiative to change their situation because they are conditioned to a life of security, conformity, and conservation, all of which may appear to give one peace of mind, but in reality nothing is more damaging to the adventurous spirit within a man than a secure future. The very basic core of a man’s living spirit is his passion for adventure. The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun. If you want to get more out of life, you must lose your inclination for monotonous security and adopt a helter-skelter style of life that will at first appear to you to be crazy.” 

Doing this scared the shit out of me. But in the many years since, I am so glad that book gave me the courage to do that.

atlasobscura:

Reading in Restraint: The Last Chained Libraries

In the Middle Ages, books were incredibly scarce, and although many wanted to share knowledge with the masses, they didn’t quite trust the public. So the chained library was born, and while most of these restrained reading collections have vanished, a rare few still exist, looking much as they did centuries ago. 

Come with us for a tour of the world’s last remaining chained libraries, on Atlas Obscura!

Art precedes philosophy and even science … art is the pioneer of knowledge.
Robert Louis Stevenson (via jamesgrantbrown)
Yup, this has happened to me on several occasions. 

Yup, this has happened to me on several occasions. 

Have you ever read a quote and then realized that the author probably did not mean the quote the way in which you initially interpreted it? I just did that very thing with this quote …  LOL.

“You will never be able to experience everything. So, please, do poetical justice to your soul and simply experience yourself.”—Albert Camus

[Ladies, you might want to keep this one in mind when telling an unwanted guy to eloquently get lost!]

Book Meme

[I don’t typically do memes but this one looked too good to pass up]

Hi there! I tagged you in a book tag. Check it out if you get bored. Have a lovely week!

Love your blog as always. ;) — journaling-junkie

Rules: Answer 10 books that have changed you … [Mine are in no particular order]

1. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
2. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
3. Dhalgren by Samuel R. Delany
4. Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
5. On Writing by Stephen King
6. The Savage Tales of Solomon Kane by Robert E. Howard
7. What St. Paul Really Said by N.T. Wright
8. Traveling Music by Neil Peart
9. The Snake-Lover’s Diary by Barbara Brenner
10. The Bible

Note: This list is not merely a list of favorite books. In fact some of these books are not my favorites. I did exactly what the meme asked - list 10 books that changed me. In one sense or another the above 10 books have changed me. Some have caused me to change directions in life, some have made me rethink my jobs/career path, one of those books made me want to write (probably not one you might think). In fact, the stories about how these books have changed me are almost as interesting as the books themselves.