Reading is that fruitful miracle of a communication in the midst of solitude
Marcel Proust (via rulesofearth)

“Ave lectio” (ilustración de JUNGheartmade)

“Ave lectio” (ilustración de JUNGheartmade)


Shakespeare and Company by Mark Dodge Medlin 

I. Must. Go. Here!
A Place to Hide Out!

A Place to Hide Out!

theatlantic:

What Is a Book?

BookTraces is a new project to track down the human markings in 19th-century books that, in the era of digitization, will (at best) end up in deep storage throughout the nation’s library system. 
The books are “a massive, distributed archive of the history of reading, hidden in plain sight in the circulating collections,” the site argues. “Marginalia, inscriptions, photos, original manuscripts, letters, drawings, and many other unique pieces of historical data can be found in individual copies… Each book has to be opened and examined.”
While the implications of this research are large for librarians (more on that anon), for the lay person, there is a fascinating question at the heart of this project to find and preserve unique copies of old texts:
What is a book?
In the Kindle era, it seems pretty obvious. There is an implicit argument in the act of digitizing a book and removing it from the shelf: a book is its text. A book is a unique string of words, as good as its bits.
Read more. [Image: Booktraces.org]

theatlantic:

What Is a Book?

BookTraces is a new project to track down the human markings in 19th-century books that, in the era of digitization, will (at best) end up in deep storage throughout the nation’s library system. 

The books are “a massive, distributed archive of the history of reading, hidden in plain sight in the circulating collections,” the site argues. “Marginalia, inscriptions, photos, original manuscripts, letters, drawings, and many other unique pieces of historical data can be found in individual copies… Each book has to be opened and examined.”

While the implications of this research are large for librarians (more on that anon), for the lay person, there is a fascinating question at the heart of this project to find and preserve unique copies of old texts:

What is a book?

In the Kindle era, it seems pretty obvious. There is an implicit argument in the act of digitizing a book and removing it from the shelf: a book is its text. A book is a unique string of words, as good as its bits.

Read more. [Image: Booktraces.org]

camill200:

Always dreaming 🌙

camill200:

Always dreaming 🌙

I’ve always been uninterested in boundaries or quarantines between tastes and types, between mediums and genres.
Yup.

Yup.

I must disagree with you when you speak of writing as a profession for which you are not fitted. With your intense sensitiveness to the color of the past, the pageantry of time and change, the atmosphere of places, and the tense drama of interacting civilizations, nations, and individuals - and with your spontaneous, zestful use of fluent, graphic language and vividly significant imagery - I would be tempted to say that you are a natural born author if there ever was one! Anybody who responds to life as you do - finding everything around you a basis of expanding circles of associative reflection and emotion which apparently clamor for expression - is by that very circumstance essentially the stuff of authors. Indeed, I’d call that responsiveness the real test of genuine artist as opposed to a mere fluent technician. Of all the writers with whom I’ve been in contact, I don’t know of one who really has more to say, or says anything with more convincing gusto than yourself.
H.P Lovecraft to Robert E. Howard; A Means to Freedom: The Letters of H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard: 1930—1932; (From a letter dated Nov 7 1932)
There are many, many types of books in the world, which makes good sense, because there are many, many types of people, and everybody wants to read something different.
Lemony Snicket; The Bad Beginning
I suggest that the only books that influence us are those for which we are ready, and which have gone a little further down our particular path than we have yet gone ourselves.
E.M. Forster
True.

True.

There’s a hunger for stories in all of us, adults too. We need stories so much that we’re even willing to read bad books to get them, if the good books won’t supply them.
Philip Pullman
“When you’re working very hard you’re not lonely; you are the whole damn world.” —Shelby Foote http://tpr.ly/i2KWZO

“When you’re working very hard you’re not lonely; you are the whole damn world.” —Shelby Foote http://tpr.ly/i2KWZO