Posts tagged books

All books are divisible into two classes: the books of the hours, and the books of all Time.
John Ruskin; Sesame and Lilies
His habit of reading isolated him: it became such a need that after being in company for some time he grew tired and restless; he was vain of the wider knowledge he had acquired from the perusal of so many books, his mind was alert, and he had not the skill to hide his contempt for his companions’ stupidity. They complained that he was conceited; and, since he excelled only in matters which to them were unimportant, they asked satirically what he had to be conceited about. He was developing a sense of humour, and found that he had a knack of saying bitter things, which caught people on the raw; he said them because they amused him, hardly realising how much they hurt, and was much offended when he found that his victims regarded him with active dislike. The humiliations he suffered when he first went to school had caused in him a shrinking from his fellows which he could never entirely overcome; he remained shy and silent. But though he did everything to alienate the sympathy of other boys he longed with all his heart for the popularity which to some was so easily accorded. These from his distance he admired extravagantly; and though he was inclined to be more sarcastic with them than with others, though he made little jokes at their expense, he would have given anything to change places with them.
W. Somerset Maugham; Of Human Bondage
Make Time To Read!

Make Time To Read!

youngadultatbooktopia:

If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.
– Haruki Murakami

If you are destined to become a writer, you can’t help it. If you can help it, you aren’t destined to become a writer. The frustrations and disappointments, not even to mention the unspeakable loneliness, are too unbearable for anyone who doesn’t have a deep sense of being unable to avoid writing.
Donald Harington
Make time to read!

Make time to read!

teachingliteracy:

Higher Learning by jhutter

Let reading take you places.

teachingliteracy:

Higher Learning by jhutter

Let reading take you places.

theparisreview:

Kurt Vonnegut reads from Slaughterhouse-Five. (via)

This is, to say the least, awesome!

SEPTEMBER 14, 2014, 9:45 AM|When Kathy Rackley told Malcolm Mitchell - a wide receiver at the University of Georgia - about her book club, she had no idea who he was, or what would happen next. Steve Hartman reports on what one college football player calls his greatest accomplishment.

September 8 was proclaimed International Literacy Day by UNESCO on November 17, 1965. It was first celebrated in 1966. Its aim is to highlight the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies. On International Literacy Day each year, UNESCO reminds the international community of the status of literacy and adult learning globally. Celebrations take place around the world.

Some 775 million adults lack minimum literacy skills; one in five adults is still not literate and two-thirds of them are women; 60.7 million children are out-of-school and many more attend irregularly or drop out. Read More || Edit || Quote by me.

253 plays

oupacademic:

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography podcast: Arthur Conan Doyle, writer

Conan Doyle’s fiction made astonishing progress in the early 1880s. He learned the economics of the short story from the work of Guy de Maupassant and from the Edinburgh medical journals with their logical progress from case-statement to collection of symptoms, rival diagnoses, and finally to ultimate conclusion and explanation. His first translation of these techniques into fiction ended in what is now called A Study in Scarlet. The story brought together Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time and a lifelong series was launched.

The story of Arthur Conan Doyle is one of over 200 episodes available from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography’s podcast archive. New episodes are released every second Wednesday.

Image: Portrait of Arthur Conan Doyle, The Canadian Magazine. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

A perfect way to start your morning.

A perfect way to start your morning.

Alan Moore finishes million-word novel Jerusalem

I love Alan Moore’s work. Can’t wait to see this work published!

macrolit:

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky