Posts tagged kurt vonnegut

theparisreview:

Kurt Vonnegut reads from Slaughterhouse-Five. (via)

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

By working so hard at becoming wise and reasonable and well-informed, you have made our little planet, our precious little moist, blue-green ball, a saner place than it was before you got here.
Kurt Vonnegut (via musing-bibliophage)
The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.

Kurt Vonnegut (via pegasusbooks)

[Just barely, just barely.]

blackballoonpublishing:

Kurt Vonnegut’s rejection letter from The Atlantic. (via Open Culture)

blackballoonpublishing:

Kurt Vonnegut’s rejection letter from The Atlantic. (via Open Culture)

honeyforthehomeless:

Happy birthday, Kurt Vonnegut.
November 11, 1922 - April 11, 2007. 

Happy belated birthday, Kurt!

honeyforthehomeless:

Happy birthday, Kurt Vonnegut.

November 11, 1922 - April 11, 2007. 

Happy belated birthday, Kurt!

I believe that reading and writing are the most nourishing forms of meditation anyone has so far found. By reading the writings of the most interesting minds in history, we meditate with our own minds and theirs as well. This to me is a miracle.
Kurt Vonnegut; Palm Sunday: An Autobiographical Collage
penamerican:

17 Personal Essays That Will Change Your Life
David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion, George Orwell, Kurt Vonnegut, Nora Ephron…the gang’s all here. 

penamerican:

17 Personal Essays That Will Change Your Life

David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion, George Orwell, Kurt Vonnegut, Nora Ephron…the gang’s all here. 

A book is an arrangement of twenty-six phonetic symbols, ten numerals, and about eight punctuation marks, and people can cast their eyes over these and envision the eruption of Mount Vesuvius or the Battle of Waterloo.
Kurt Vonnegut
wordsarefornerds:

“Do you realize that all great literature is all about what a bummer it is to be a human being? Isn’t it such a relief to have somebody say that?”- Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country

wordsarefornerds:


“Do you realize that all great literature is all about what a bummer it is to be a human being? Isn’t it such a relief to have somebody say that?”

- Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country

“And on the subject of burning books: I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength or their powerful political connections or their great wealth, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and have refused to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.”

Kurt Vonnegut; A Man Without a Country

useyourmanners:

Vonnegut, 1995 (left), and McCarthy, 1975, both self portraits.
More fascinating self-portraiture by famous authors here.

martinaboone:

The Shapes of Stories by Kurt Vonnegut via Kami Garcia

martinaboone:

The Shapes of Stories by Kurt Vonnegut via Kami Garcia

“My life is nothing but room for you.” I said. “It could never be filled by anyone but you.”
Kurt Vonnegut (via rarararambles)