Posts tagged lit

Novels without female characters were a lifeless desert.
Ian McEwan (Sweet Tooth)

book-of-flights:

This 1837 tome of Byron’s works could be worth it entirely for the footnotes. They are peppered with gossip, fawning literary criticism and the weirdest biographical details from Byron’s journals, letters, and accounts of people who knew him. Here’s a random selection, because it’s impossible to read them all.

okuma-gunlugum:


There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.

                                                                                                                          Elias Canetti

okuma-gunlugum:

There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.

                                                                                                                          Elias Canetti

ilovereadingandwriting:

we write (via Pinterest)

Indeed.

ilovereadingandwriting:

we write (via Pinterest)

Indeed.

Community Post: 11 Extremely Rare Books You'll Wish You Could Afford

There a few others I would add to this list, but wow, what a list.

A Literary Travel Guide To The USA

Must. Visit. All. These!

50 Cool Authors, Period - BOOK RIOT

INFOGRAPHIC: Word Counts of Famous Books | Electric Literature

Very Fascinating!

Interesting.

Interesting.

Censorship ends in logical completeness when nobody is allowed to read any books except the books that nobody can read.
George Bernard Shaw;  [As quoted in Literary Censorship in England (in Current Opinion, Vol. 55, No. 5, November 1913)]
It had been startling and disappointing to me to find out that story books had been written by people, that books were not natural wonders, coming up of themselves like grass. Yet regardless of where they come from, I cannot remember a time when I was not in love with them — with the books themselves, cover and binding and the paper they were printed on, with their smell and their weight and with their possession in my arms, captured and carried off to myself. Still illiterate, I was ready for them, committed to all the reading I could give them …
Eudora Welty; One Writer’s Beginnings (William E.Massey Senior Lectures in the History of American Civilization)
We may sit in our library and yet be in all quarters of the earth.
John Lubbock; The Pleasures of Life
Love doesn’t just sit there, like a stone, it has to be made, like bread; remade all the time, made new.
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Lathe of Heaven (via venuscomb)
I’m a word freak. I like words. I’ve always compared writing to music. That’s the way I feel about good paragraphs. When it really works, it’s like music.
Hunter S. Thompson (via wordsnquotes)