Posts tagged lit

I find it hard to name the one book that was so damn delightful it changed my life. The truth is, they have all changed my life, every single one of them—even the ones I hated. Books are my version of “experiences.” I’m made of them.

the manuscripts of the masters: 20th century writers 

jean-louis lebris de kerouac
francis scott key fitzgerald
ernest miller hemingway
john ronald reule tolkien 
john ernst steinbeck, jr
Censoring books that deal with difficult, adolescent issues does not protect anybody. Quite the opposite. It leaves kids in darkness and makes them vulnerable.

Laurie Halse Anderson (via booksturnmugglesintowizards)

Exactly!

"When a new book is published read an old one."

John Keats' letter to Fanny Brawne, June 1820.

“Upon my soul I have loved you to the extreme. I wish you could know the Tenderness with which I continually brood over your different aspects of countenance, action and dress. I see you come down in the morning: I see you meet me at the Window–I see every thing over again eternally that I ever have seen. If I get on the pleasant clue I live in a sort of happy misery, if on the unpleasant ’tis miserable misery(…) If I am destined to be happy with you here–how short is the longest Life–I wish to believe in immortality–I wish to live with you for ever(…) Let me be but certain that you are mine heart and soul, and I could die more happily than I could otherwise live.”

John Keats Collection, 1814-1891; MS Keats 1, Letters by John Keats. Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Novels without female characters were a lifeless desert.
Ian McEwan (Sweet Tooth)

book-of-flights:

This 1837 tome of Byron’s works could be worth it entirely for the footnotes. They are peppered with gossip, fawning literary criticism and the weirdest biographical details from Byron’s journals, letters, and accounts of people who knew him. Here’s a random selection, because it’s impossible to read them all.

okuma-gunlugum:


There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.

                                                                                                                          Elias Canetti

okuma-gunlugum:

There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.

                                                                                                                          Elias Canetti

ilovereadingandwriting:

we write (via Pinterest)

Indeed.

ilovereadingandwriting:

we write (via Pinterest)

Indeed.

Community Post: 11 Extremely Rare Books You'll Wish You Could Afford

There a few others I would add to this list, but wow, what a list.

A Literary Travel Guide To The USA

Must. Visit. All. These!

50 Cool Authors, Period - BOOK RIOT

INFOGRAPHIC: Word Counts of Famous Books | Electric Literature

Very Fascinating!

Interesting.

Interesting.

Censorship ends in logical completeness when nobody is allowed to read any books except the books that nobody can read.
George Bernard Shaw;  [As quoted in Literary Censorship in England (in Current Opinion, Vol. 55, No. 5, November 1913)]