Posts tagged lit

Why Do Women Read More Novels Than Men?

C’mon men pick up those novels and read!!!

People don’t listen, they just wait for their turn to talk.
Chuck Palahniuk (via thiskidmatt)
If you are destined to become a writer, you can’t help it. If you can help it, you aren’t destined to become a writer. The frustrations and disappointments, not even to mention the unspeakable loneliness, are too unbearable for anyone who doesn’t have a deep sense of being unable to avoid writing.
Donald Harington
benbrahemb:

"The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us, and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone."
-George Eliot-

benbrahemb:

"The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us, and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone."

-George Eliot-

teachingliteracy:

Higher Learning by jhutter

Let reading take you places.

teachingliteracy:

Higher Learning by jhutter

Let reading take you places.

All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse and the sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was. If you can get so that you can give that to people, then you are a writer.
Ernest Hemingway in Esquire, December 1934
apoetreflects:

“It is usual that the moment you write for publication … one stiffens in exactly the same way one does when one is being photographed.  The simplest way to overcome this is to write it to someone, like me.  Write it as a letter aimed at one person.  This removes the vague terror of addressing the large and faceless audience and it also, you will find, will give a sense of freedom and a lack of self-consciousness.”
—John Steinbeck, from The Writer’s Chapbook, edited and introduced by George Plimpton (Viking Penguin, 1989)

apoetreflects:

“It is usual that the moment you write for publication … one stiffens in exactly the same way one does when one is being photographed.  The simplest way to overcome this is to write it to someone, like me.  Write it as a letter aimed at one person.  This removes the vague terror of addressing the large and faceless audience and it also, you will find, will give a sense of freedom and a lack of self-consciousness.”

—John Steinbeck, from The Writer’s Chapbook, edited and introduced by George Plimpton (Viking Penguin, 1989)

Listen to your life. See it for the fathomless mystery it is. In the boredom and pain of it, no less than in the excitement and gladness: touch, taste, smell your way to the holy and hidden heart of it, because in the last analysis all moments are key moments, and life itself is grace.
Frederick Buechner (via misswallflower)

theparisreview:

Kurt Vonnegut reads from Slaughterhouse-Five. (via)

"I’ve read some stories where it’s difficult to tell where the story stops and I begin. Those are the best stories."—TBV

"I’ve read some stories where it’s difficult to tell where the story stops and I begin. Those are the best stories."—TBV

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers

As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.

253 plays

oupacademic:

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography podcast: Arthur Conan Doyle, writer

Conan Doyle’s fiction made astonishing progress in the early 1880s. He learned the economics of the short story from the work of Guy de Maupassant and from the Edinburgh medical journals with their logical progress from case-statement to collection of symptoms, rival diagnoses, and finally to ultimate conclusion and explanation. His first translation of these techniques into fiction ended in what is now called A Study in Scarlet. The story brought together Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time and a lifelong series was launched.

The story of Arthur Conan Doyle is one of over 200 episodes available from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography’s podcast archive. New episodes are released every second Wednesday.

Image: Portrait of Arthur Conan Doyle, The Canadian Magazine. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Whenever I have endured or accomplished some difficult task — such as watching television, going out socially or sleeping — I always look forward to rewarding myself with the small pleasure of getting back to my typewriter and writing something.
Isaac Asimov
A novelist has to know enough about a subject to fool the passenger next to him on an airplane.
David Foster Wallace

Alan Moore finishes million-word novel Jerusalem

I love Alan Moore’s work. Can’t wait to see this work published!