Posts tagged lit

Happy birthday H.P. Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937)
“I couldn’t live a week without a private library—indeed, I’d part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I’d let go of the 1500 or so books I possess.”
Ten Things You Should Know About H.P. Lovecraft

Happy birthday H.P. Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937)

“I couldn’t live a week without a private library—indeed, I’d part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I’d let go of the 1500 or so books I possess.”

Ten Things You Should Know About H.P. Lovecraft

I like to think that each book I start is a completely new departure … But I’ve learned that whatever you do, readers will have no difficulty assimilating it into what you’ve done before.
I drink to the ruined house,
To the evil of my life,
To our shared loneliness
And I drink to you-
To the lie of lips that betrayed me,
To the deadly coldness of the eyes,
To the fact that the world is cruel and depraved,
To the fact that God did not save.
Emily Dickinson, The Last Toast (via poemusicoffee)
Indeed.

Indeed.

torbooks:

(via Announcing the 2014 Hugo Award Winners | Tor.com)
Congratulations to all the winners!

torbooks:

(via Announcing the 2014 Hugo Award Winners | Tor.com)

Congratulations to all the winners!

My God, he couldn’t help thinking, how terrible it is to be that age, to have emotions so near the surface that the slightest turbulence causes them to boil over. That, very simply, was what adulthood must be all about — acquiring the skill to bury things more deeply. Out of sight and, whenever possible, out of mind.
Richard Russo; Empire Falls
Books on the bookshelves
And stacked on the floor
Books kept in baskets
And propped by the door
Books in neat piles
And in disarray
Books tucked in closets
And books on display
Books filling crannies
And books packed in nooks
Books massed in windows
And mounded in crooks
Libraries beckon
And bookstores invite
But book-filled rooms welcome
Us back home at night!
L.R. Knost

5 Reasons Why Twentysomethings Should Read Tolstoy

slightlyignorant:

Day 34 by Wouter de Bruijn on Flickr.

Just Read!

slightlyignorant:

Day 34 by Wouter de Bruijn on Flickr.

Just Read!

Writing involves thinking all the unthinkable stuff while still taking care of business. Writing then, must feel risky in order to feel like life. I used to cringe when people talked about ‘brave’ writing. I’d think, calm down, it’s not like you’re a fireman or a Special Forces commando. If the mission fails, just toss it in the wastebasket. But I do think, upon reflection, that there is a need to generate emotional risk, a sense of imminence, of danger, in order to transmit that aliveness to the page. This needn’t mean personal revelation or offensive language. Sometimes quiet, dense writing is the most deeply and complexly honest. Sometimes intellectual discourse is brave in our Twitter culture. Genuine and sincere emotion can be risky in a world of snark and irony. So can making silly jokes about matters our society regards with sanctimonious seriousness. Sometimes it is just a matter of a writer doing what she does not yet know how to do, speaking about something he does not yet understand. The risk of ambitious failure.
David Gordon (via mttbll)
What a story is, is devious. It pretends transparency, forthrightness. It engages with ordinary people, ordinary matters, recognizable stuff. But this is all a masquerade. What good stories deal with is the horror and incomprehensibility of time, the dark encroachment of old catastrophes…
Joy Williams (via mttbll)

You think, as you walk away from Le Cirque des Rêves and into the creeping dawn, that you felt more awake within the confines of the circus.

You are no longer quite certain which side of the fence is the dream.

We are all sentenced to solitary confinement inside our own skins, for life.
Tennessee Williams  (via beautilation)
… to read, we need a certain kind of silence, an ability to filter out the noise. That seems increasingly elusive in our overnetworked society, where every buzz and rumor is instantly blogged and tweeted, and it is not contemplation we desire but an odd sort of distraction, distraction masquerading as being in the know. In such a landscape, knowledge can’t help but fall prey to illusion, albeit an illusion that is deeply seductive, with its promise that speed can lead us to more illumination, that it is more important to react than to think deeply, that something must be attached to every bit of time. Here, we have my reading problem in a nutshell, for books insist we take the opposite position, that we immerse, slow down.
David L. Ulin, The Lost Art of Reading (via litverve)
Bookstores always remind me that there are good things in this world.
Vincent van Gogh (via dostoievski-is-my-soulmate)