Posts tagged novel

otherwinchester:

DA LIT MEME  (3/10 SERIES OR BOOKS)

→ THE CATCHER IN THE RYE by J.D Salinger

I’ve always known that there’s more going on inside me than finds its way into the world, but this is probably true of everyone. Who doesn’t regret that he isn’t more fully understood?
Richard Russo; Bridge of Sighs
If you don’t like the world you live in, create a new one, put it on paper, sell it widely, and perhaps the world will finally understand what it needs to do to improve itself.
TBV; from a work in progress
On the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much—the wheel, New York, wars and so on—while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man—for precisely the same reasons.

Douglas Adams, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy (via feeling-natures-glow)

[Is it not Towel Day yet?]

And this I believe: that the free, exploring mind of the individual human is the most valuable thing in the world. And this I would fight for: the freedom of the mind to take any direction it wishes, undirected.
John Steinbeck; East of Eden
From that time on, the world was hers for the reading. She would never be lonely again, never miss the lack of intimate friends. Books became her friends and there was one for every mood. There was poetry for quiet companionship. There was adventure when she tired of quiet hours. There would be love stories when she came into adolescence and when she wanted to feel a closeness to someone she could read a biography. On that day when she first knew she could read, she made a vow to read one book a day as long as she lived.
Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (via bookporn)

papertownbooks:

We recently acquired—from Larry McMurtry—a Signed First Edition copy of Jhumpa Lahiri’s work title The Namesake. It’s for sale at our website.

susanandherbooks:

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole

Click here for previous favourite Book Covers Posts

I’m currently reading this work.

It didn’t matter in the end how old they had been, or that they were girls, but only that we had loved them, and that they hadn’t heard us calling, still do not hear us, up here in the tree house with our thinning hair and soft bellies, calling them out of those rooms where they went to be alone for all time, alone in suicide, which is deeper than death, and where we will never find the pieces to put them back together.
Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides (via englishmajorinrepair)

papertownbooks:

We have several of J.M. Cotzee’s work on sale at 50% off. See them at our website.

I must say a word about fear. It is life’s only true opponent. Only fear can defeat life. It is a clever, treacherous adversary, how well I know. It has no decency, respects no law or convention, shows no mercy. It goes for your weakest spot, which it finds with unnerving ease. It begins in your mind, always … so you must fight hard to express it. You must fight hard to shine the light of words upon it. Because if you don’t, if your fear becomes a wordless darkness that you avoid, perhaps even manage to forget, you open yourself to further attacks of fear because you never truly fought the opponent who defeated you.
Yann Martel; Life of Pi
You’re alive…That means you have infinite potential. You can do anything, make anything, dream anything. If you change the world, the world will change. Potential. Once you’re dead, it’s gone. Over. You’ve made what you’ve made, dreamed your dream, written your name.
 Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book (via missing-wall-e)
A short story is a love affair, a novel is a marriage. A short story is a photograph; a novel is a film.
Lorrie Moore
In Tereza’s eyes, books were the emblems of a secret brotherhood. For she had but a single weapon against the world of crudity surrounding her: the novels. She had read any number of them, from Fielding to Thomas Mann. They not only offered the possibility of an imaginary escape from a life she found unsatisfying; they also had a meaning for her as physical objects: she loved to walk down the street with a book under her arm. It had the same significance for her as an elegant cane from the dandy a century ago. It differentiated her from others.
Milan Kundera; The Unbearable Lightness of Being