Posts tagged stories

[Infographic] Banned Books Week

The right to free expression includes the freedom to read whatever we choose. Yet state governments and local school districts have attempted to ban the books shown on this bookmark. Since its inception, the ACLU has fought censorship - because a government that polices what we read polices our thought.

Yup, that ought to do it.

Yup, that ought to do it.

theparisreview:

Woolf v. Wharton: “Critics exalted Dalloway as an important advance in literature. In the Saturday Review, the critic Gerald Bullett unfavorably compared Wharton’s latest, A Mother’s Recompense, with Mrs. Dalloway, calling Woolf ‘a brilliant experimentalist,’ while Wharton was ‘content to practice the craft of fiction without attempting to enlarge its technical scope.’ ” Wharton was stung by the slight, and disapproved of modernist experimentalism—but it may have goaded her into attempting a “stunning narrative maneuver” in The Age of Innocence.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Woolf v. Wharton: “Critics exalted Dalloway as an important advance in literature. In the Saturday Review, the critic Gerald Bullett unfavorably compared Wharton’s latest, A Mother’s Recompense, with Mrs. Dalloway, calling Woolf ‘a brilliant experimentalist,’ while Wharton was ‘content to practice the craft of fiction without attempting to enlarge its technical scope.’ ” Wharton was stung by the slight, and disapproved of modernist experimentalism—but it may have goaded her into attempting a “stunning narrative maneuver” in The Age of Innocence.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

writersatwork:

Italo Calvino

writersatwork:

Italo Calvino

Happy Birthday, Stephen King b. September 21, 1947
“Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”—Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Happy Birthday, Stephen King b. September 21, 1947

“Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”—Stephen KingOn Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

​Almanac: Penguin Books

Why Do Women Read More Novels Than Men?

C’mon men pick up those novels and read!!!

yocalio:

"If the novel has a theme it is that of survival. What makes some people able to come through catastrophes and others, apparently just as able, strong and brave, go under? It happens in every upheaval. Some people survive; others don’t. What qualities are in those who fight their way through triumphantly that are lacking in those who go under…? I only know that the survivors used to call that quality ‘gumption.’ So I wrote about the people who had gumption and the people who didn’t.”  — Margaret Mitchell, 1936

"I’ve read some stories where it’s difficult to tell where the story stops and I begin. Those are the best stories."—TBV

"I’ve read some stories where it’s difficult to tell where the story stops and I begin. Those are the best stories."—TBV

253 plays

oupacademic:

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography podcast: Arthur Conan Doyle, writer

Conan Doyle’s fiction made astonishing progress in the early 1880s. He learned the economics of the short story from the work of Guy de Maupassant and from the Edinburgh medical journals with their logical progress from case-statement to collection of symptoms, rival diagnoses, and finally to ultimate conclusion and explanation. His first translation of these techniques into fiction ended in what is now called A Study in Scarlet. The story brought together Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time and a lifelong series was launched.

The story of Arthur Conan Doyle is one of over 200 episodes available from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography’s podcast archive. New episodes are released every second Wednesday.

Image: Portrait of Arthur Conan Doyle, The Canadian Magazine. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Alan Moore finishes million-word novel Jerusalem

I love Alan Moore’s work. Can’t wait to see this work published!

macrolit:

The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky

Reading takes you places (just got this t-shirt)

Reading takes you places (just got this t-shirt)

When you can state the theme of a story, when you can separate it from the story itself, then you can be sure the story is not a very good one. The meaning of a story has to be embodied in it, has to be made concrete in it. A story is a way to say something that can’t be said any other way, and it takes every word in the story to say what the meaning is. You tell a story because a statement would be inadequate. When anybody asks what a story is about, the only proper thing is to tell him to read the story. The meaning of fiction is not abstract meaning but experienced meaning, and the purpose of making statements about the meaning of a story is only to help you experience that meaning more fully.
Flannery O’Connor (via nathanielstuart)