Posts tagged writers

kellysue:

comixology:

comiXology’s Creator of the Week: Kelly Sue DeConnick 
It is with much excitement that our next comiXology Creator of the Week is the incredible Kelly Sue DeConnick! 
Not only has Kelly Sue established herself as one of the most unique and progressive voices in all of comicsdom, but has become of figurehead of the forward march into the future of comics, indefatigably championing representation and inclusiveness across the whole industry. 
It’s no surprise that KSD’s rise to popularity has been anything but meteoric, and we can’t wait to see what comes next. 
Follow Kelly Sue on twitter & here on tumblr: kellysue
Stay tuned for more on Kelly Sue throughout the week as well as some social-media-exclusive discount codes!
comiXology’s Creator of the Week highlights one of our favorite people in comics starting each Monday.

This is so cool! 

She is by far one of the greatest female comic book writers at work today.

kellysue:

comixology:

comiXology’s Creator of the Week: Kelly Sue DeConnick 

It is with much excitement that our next comiXology Creator of the Week is the incredible Kelly Sue DeConnick! 

Not only has Kelly Sue established herself as one of the most unique and progressive voices in all of comicsdom, but has become of figurehead of the forward march into the future of comics, indefatigably championing representation and inclusiveness across the whole industry. 

It’s no surprise that KSD’s rise to popularity has been anything but meteoric, and we can’t wait to see what comes next. 

Follow Kelly Sue on twitter & here on tumblr: kellysue

Stay tuned for more on Kelly Sue throughout the week as well as some social-media-exclusive discount codes!


comiXology’s Creator of the Week highlights one of our favorite people in comics starting each Monday.

This is so cool! 

She is by far one of the greatest female comic book writers at work today.

theparisreview:

Go on, go on down,      bring the man up …                          In here, Mr. Wilde. This room is not such a ruin as it seems:                          I find most things I search for without much trouble—
In 1882, Walt Whitman and Oscar Wilde spent an afternoon together. They had some homemade elderberry wine and talked about how to be famous. Above is Richard Howard’s imaginary account of the meeting, from his poem “Wildflowers.”

theparisreview:

Go on, go on down,
      bring the man up …
                          In here, Mr. Wilde.
This room is not such a ruin as it seems:
                          I find most things I search for
without much trouble—

In 1882, Walt Whitman and Oscar Wilde spent an afternoon together. They had some homemade elderberry wine and talked about how to be famous. Above is Richard Howard’s imaginary account of the meeting, from his poem “Wildflowers.”

The Worst Ways to Begin Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents - The Write Life

Good advice from literary agents.

I’ve personally heard 8 out of the 10.

I’ve personally heard 8 out of the 10.

theparisreview:

Congratulations to Ursula K. Le Guin for the National Book Foundation’s 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and Louise Erdrich for the PEN/Saul Bellow prize!

Famous Writers’ Sleep Habits vs. Literary Productivity, Visualized

Recent acquisitions. 

theparisreview:

Woolf v. Wharton: “Critics exalted Dalloway as an important advance in literature. In the Saturday Review, the critic Gerald Bullett unfavorably compared Wharton’s latest, A Mother’s Recompense, with Mrs. Dalloway, calling Woolf ‘a brilliant experimentalist,’ while Wharton was ‘content to practice the craft of fiction without attempting to enlarge its technical scope.’ ” Wharton was stung by the slight, and disapproved of modernist experimentalism—but it may have goaded her into attempting a “stunning narrative maneuver” in The Age of Innocence.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Woolf v. Wharton: “Critics exalted Dalloway as an important advance in literature. In the Saturday Review, the critic Gerald Bullett unfavorably compared Wharton’s latest, A Mother’s Recompense, with Mrs. Dalloway, calling Woolf ‘a brilliant experimentalist,’ while Wharton was ‘content to practice the craft of fiction without attempting to enlarge its technical scope.’ ” Wharton was stung by the slight, and disapproved of modernist experimentalism—but it may have goaded her into attempting a “stunning narrative maneuver” in The Age of Innocence.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Happy Birthday, Stephen King b. September 21, 1947
“Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”—Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Happy Birthday, Stephen King b. September 21, 1947

“Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”—Stephen KingOn Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

apoetreflects:

“It is usual that the moment you write for publication … one stiffens in exactly the same way one does when one is being photographed.  The simplest way to overcome this is to write it to someone, like me.  Write it as a letter aimed at one person.  This removes the vague terror of addressing the large and faceless audience and it also, you will find, will give a sense of freedom and a lack of self-consciousness.”
—John Steinbeck, from The Writer’s Chapbook, edited and introduced by George Plimpton (Viking Penguin, 1989)

apoetreflects:

“It is usual that the moment you write for publication … one stiffens in exactly the same way one does when one is being photographed.  The simplest way to overcome this is to write it to someone, like me.  Write it as a letter aimed at one person.  This removes the vague terror of addressing the large and faceless audience and it also, you will find, will give a sense of freedom and a lack of self-consciousness.”

—John Steinbeck, from The Writer’s Chapbook, edited and introduced by George Plimpton (Viking Penguin, 1989)

249 plays

oupacademic:

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography podcast: Arthur Conan Doyle, writer

Conan Doyle’s fiction made astonishing progress in the early 1880s. He learned the economics of the short story from the work of Guy de Maupassant and from the Edinburgh medical journals with their logical progress from case-statement to collection of symptoms, rival diagnoses, and finally to ultimate conclusion and explanation. His first translation of these techniques into fiction ended in what is now called A Study in Scarlet. The story brought together Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time and a lifelong series was launched.

The story of Arthur Conan Doyle is one of over 200 episodes available from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography’s podcast archive. New episodes are released every second Wednesday.

Image: Portrait of Arthur Conan Doyle, The Canadian Magazine. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women for the money. And it made her miserable.

As a young writer, Alcott concentrated on lurid pulp stories of revenge, murder, and adultery–“blood and thunder” literature, as she called i–and enjoyed writing very much. She was in her mid 30s when an editor suggested she try writing a book for girls. Alcott wasn’t very interested, but her father was a complete moron with money and had left the family in terrible financial trouble. Alcott wrote Little Women in hopes of some decent sales and a little breathing room and got way more than she asked for. The money in sequels was too good to turn down (and her father didn’t get any smarter with a dime), but Alcott hated writing what she called “moral pap for the young” and longed to return to the smut and violence of her early endeavors.

austinkleon:

Photographs of writers at work.

Note how many standing desks! See also a great book on the subject, The Writer’s Desk.

Filed under: work spaces

David Foster Wallace was by the end a good person, loved and mourned by just about everyone except Bret Easton Ellis. It’s possible to see Wallace’s career as the inversion of that of another great American novelist who wrote journalism that was pervaded by his personality: Norman Mailer. Monstrousness was the thing Mailer was always trying to enact and the thing Wallace was always trying to deflect or recover from. Wallace was consumed by guilt even on the page; Mailer never seemed to feel a pang. Wallace couldn’t stand Mailer’s books: ‘Unutterably repulsive. I guess part of his whole charm is his knack for arousing strong reactions. Hitler had the same gift.’
Christian Lorentzen’s LRB review of ‘Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace’ by D.T. Max

thorindurin:

For those who have never heard J.R.R. Tolkien sing, voilà!


“That’s what Bilbo Baggins hates!” sung by the legend himself.